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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by From the Desk of Father Rubey
In January, we begin a New Year and many of us have New Year’s resolutions such as losing weight, getting more exercise or doing something positive to improve our lives such as being more understanding towards our loved ones. Former Vice President Joe Biden recently came out with a memoir detailing events in his life and what he learned from the tragedies.
Empty Space
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a spouse’s suicide surviving parents may look into the rooms of their home and see remnants of a family life that is upside down. As a family begins to acclimate to the disorder posed by the beginning of the grief journey, it might be useful to realize that a world where meaningful structure has been disabled by a traumatic loss adds an element of strangeness in familiar spaces.

Archives:

Visions of Those We’ve Lost
Tuesday, March 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Writing this month, I am drawing from my personal experience with grief.  The grief experiences of some teens and adults that have been shared with me in counseling sessions have often been intimate and vivid, and I sometimes take what others have shared and use them to examine my own response to loss.  I observe in others and notice in myself that a visceral, experiential memory of the deceased person may be an automatic grief response that applies to almost every age of survivor.   How might we otherwise explain these intense moments that seem to capture us and stop time?  Perhaps this is one way we attempt to compensate for a loss, to repair an intolerable breach of attachment.
Is My Child Grieving?
Monday, February 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
I often talk with new LOSS members who are parents with children at home. They are clearly reaching out for direction and support, still shell-shocked perhaps months later, but responding to a sense that they need to make sure their kids are okay. I may hear, “She doesn’t seem to be grieving. How can I tell?” These parents have no problem recognizing their own grief. Clearly, attending to each day is an effort. They struggle with emotional absence where their children are concerned. They are able to talk about the new imbalance in their physical and emotional systems. They describe “waves” of grief, in which they feel overwhelmed with grief and sadness. Their children and teens, on the other hand, appear to have shown only initial sadness, but life still engages them. They play video games, watch TV, do homework, see friends, yet the parent senses that their child has also been changed by the loss. So parents wonder if it is normal when their child appears unchanged.