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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Friday, April 20, 2018 by Father Ruby
In May our country celebrates Mother’s Day which is a day when we honor our Mothers who are still here and fondly remember those Mothers who are a part of the hereafter. For those Mothers who are grieving the death of a child from suicide or those children who are grieving the loss of a Mother from suicide this is an especially painful day.
Family Conflict after a Suicide Loss
Friday, April 20, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Infighting and conflict after the death of a primary family member is a difficult but recognized manifestation of grief. Suicide grief, in particular, can take us down to base level, sometimes to our most primitive responses of blame and rage. These initial feelings are common, and often part of the changed world after suicide loss.

Archives:

From the Desk of Rev. Richard Jakubik
Tuesday, March 01, 2016 by Rev. Richard Jakubik
Facing suicide with Faith

“Nothing seems to matter anymore since my loved-one took his life,” said a client in a past therapy session.  “My job feels empty, my connection to family is shaken, and any past sense of well-being has been shattered.”   “I’ve lost my sense of purpose and I’m drifting away from everything and everyone that used to anchor me.” This survivor of suicide is going through what has been defined by psychotherapists as complicated or deep grief.  Losing someone you love to suicide cuts into your heart and forever redefines you and the world you live in.   Though not all survivors grieve the same way or for the same length of time, it is still essential that a survivor comes to terms with the loss and finds inner healing in their life.
Visions of Those We’ve Lost
Tuesday, March 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Writing this month, I am drawing from my personal experience with grief.  The grief experiences of some teens and adults that have been shared with me in counseling sessions have often been intimate and vivid, and I sometimes take what others have shared and use them to examine my own response to loss.  I observe in others and notice in myself that a visceral, experiential memory of the deceased person may be an automatic grief response that applies to almost every age of survivor.   How might we otherwise explain these intense moments that seem to capture us and stop time?  Perhaps this is one way we attempt to compensate for a loss, to repair an intolerable breach of attachment.