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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by From the Desk of Father Rubey
In January, we begin a New Year and many of us have New Year’s resolutions such as losing weight, getting more exercise or doing something positive to improve our lives such as being more understanding towards our loved ones. Former Vice President Joe Biden recently came out with a memoir detailing events in his life and what he learned from the tragedies.
Empty Space
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a spouse’s suicide surviving parents may look into the rooms of their home and see remnants of a family life that is upside down. As a family begins to acclimate to the disorder posed by the beginning of the grief journey, it might be useful to realize that a world where meaningful structure has been disabled by a traumatic loss adds an element of strangeness in familiar spaces.

Archives:

School Age Children and their Grief Processes
Friday, May 01, 2015 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Our LOSS children’s program receives calls from parents who previously had no need to consider counseling services for their school age children.   Parents may have been challenged to keep up with the flourishing child’s social schedule, tutor, team sports, music lessons,… but had no reason to consider that their child’s rapid developmental progress might be impacted by a profound loss, such as suicide. 
From the Desk of Rev. Richard Jakubik
Wednesday, April 01, 2015 by Rev. Richard Jakubik
Sometimes in life, a tragic event occurs that fractures the very foundation on which we stand.  Survivors of suicide navigate in a world that is profoundly and irrevocably different and challenging from the world they once knew. Survivors now find themselves in an unexpected and life long struggle with the tragic loss of a loved one to suicide.  Grief and its complications manifest as painful thoughts, feelings and behaviors that can derail the natural process of healing. Survivors who experience complicated grief go through deep, acute, and intense levels of pain, that often leave them feeling “stuck” and left behind.