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Featured this Month:

Listening to Young Children’s Grief
Thursday, May 11, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
The grief responses of parentally bereaved pre-school aged children can be easy to overlook. They are very oriented to the present, see death as reversible and their separation distress is expressed in brief episodes. Affection and attentive caregiving go a long way for bereaved children. In previous articles we have talked about the importance of attunement of the caregiver to the child’s temperament, the necessity of routine, relaxation and play, and supporting the child’s continued development. Yet, even with the essential stable base, a grieving young child’s needs may be more complex than simply coping with absence. Sometimes, children struggle with grief challenges that are tied to their particular relationship with the deceased parent, and the nature of that relationship can influence their interpretation of the parent’s sudden absence.
From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, May 11, 2017 by Father Ruby
In June, we set aside a day to honor our fathers. It is a day where we buy a gift or do something special for our fathers. The traditional gifts that fathers are given on this day range from a shirt, a tie or something for the toolbox, or something else manly. Those gifts are contrasted with the gifts we give to our mother – flowers, a box of candy or something more feminine. The cards are different. Very often a Father’s Day card has a scene that is something from the outdoors or something that is masculine as opposed to the cards that we have for our mothers. Even the messages very often lack the warmth and the care that it has in cards that are meant for our mothers. The biggest day of the year for cemetery visitation is Mother’s Day. Why not Father’s Day?

Archives:

Can a Loving Parent Create Obstacles to a Child’s Grief Process?
Thursday, September 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Parental bereavement is one of the most stressful experiences that a child can face. And sudden death, such as suicide, will usually impact children with some level of trauma because a primary  attachment bond has been  spontaneously disrupted, even violated, under circumstances that may have involved violence or exposure to the scene of death.  Consider that a child’s capacity to express and integrate aspects of grief will be limited by her current age and development.  But with support, a bereaved child will grow into a more mature understanding of the loss and internalize meaningful memories of the deceased parent.
Starting Over
Monday, August 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
our family has experienced a suicide.  In its wake the world feels different and much of what once mattered now feels less meaningful...  The first weeks and months after a suicide are disorienting, and your energy is drained.  You are only trying to survive the shock, the relentless questions, the unyielding despair. You find yourself looking for solutions because fulfilling your role as a parent has become infinitely harder.  Your children and teens are presenting with grief symptoms that you don’t understand.  Are they grieving???