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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Father Ruby
In one of the recent LOSS support groups participants found themselves talking about the impact of stigma they experienced in the wake of their loved one’s deaths. Our groups are intended to be a safe place for survivors to meet others and talk about any struggles they are experiencing. There are many things that make suicide more painful and disorienting for those left behind, and one of those things is the experience of stigma.
Private Grief Stories
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
On 9/11/17 I was watching speeches and ceremony regarding America’s evolving grief in the wake of its huge loss of life on 9/11/01. The anniversary events were beautifully intentional, formal and moving. I thought about Emily Dickenson’s verse: “After great pain, a formal feeling comes.” And I couldn’t help but think about our LOSS families. Is it odd that I might connect those experiencing the devastation of suicide loss with this grand scale, national observation of lost lives and collective meaning?

Archives:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, December 01, 2016 by Father Rubey
Reprinted from December 1999

Two religious traditions celebrate joyful religious holidays during the month of December. Our Jewish brothers and sisters celebrate the Festival of Lights. Our Christian brothers and sisters celebrate the birth of Jesus. Both traditions are joyful and uplifting events. There are family gatherings and there is an emphasis on gift giving for both of these traditions.
Private and Shared Stories of Loss
Thursday, December 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Grief, like any other emotional experience within a family, involves interplay between private and shared realities. Family members will often actively express and share, question and comment, especially in response to a loss that was sudden and unexpected. A suicide elicits not only shock, but a compelling need to make sense of what happened. This is a narrative process that is determined by developmental capacity, and even younger children will listen and wonder and protest a loved one’s sudden death.